HOLIDAY SIDEBOARD & TABLESCAPE

Sideboards are one of the most common pieces of furniture I most get asked to paint.  A sideboard is the perfect focal point in a dining room dressed for the holidays, either for serving food or for displaying seasonal decor.  We often refer to them either as "sideboards" or "buffets"?  Do you know what the difference is?  Actually none!  There is no difference between a sideboard and a buffet in terms of definition. A sideboard used in the dining room may be called a buffet, but when placed in the living room, it is called a sideboard.  

Here is one I finished painting a few weeks ago for a client.  Since we are in the holiday season, I was inspired to dress it in a holiday theme. 

Sideboard painted in Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

Sideboard painted in Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

I painted two coats of Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan in Paris Grey then lightly distressed the sideboard.  Since the wood on this sideboard had a very rough finish, instead of trying to sand it down smooth, I decided to enhance the roughness by sealing it with a coloured wax.

To make a coloured wax, take a couple of tablespoons of clear soft wax and add 1 to 2 teaspoons of Chalk Paint® and mix it up.  I chose Pure White. 

Coloured wax

Coloured wax

Wax your piece as you normally would, in small sections.  I did two coats of the coloured wax all over, but the top also got an extra coat of the soft clear wax.  The white will settle into the grooves of the wood and leave you with a washed, limed effect.

A washed effect was achieved by mixing a little paint in with the soft clear wax.

A washed effect was achieved by mixing a little paint in with the soft clear wax.

I don't have a "Before" picture of this piece of furniture, but I replaced the hardware with these pretty blue & white ceramic knobs which I received from D. Lawless Hardware.  They have a new line of beautiful handcrafted ceramic knobs at very reasonable prices.

D. Lawless Hardware handcrafted ceramic knobs

D. Lawless Hardware handcrafted ceramic knobs

D. Lawless Hardware - White Ceramic Knob w/ Blue Flower Print

D. Lawless Hardware - White Ceramic Knob w/ Blue Flower Print

You can check out all of their other models here.    

After applying the coloured white wax, I still wanted more patina, so I applied a little bit of the dark soft wax, mainly on the wood appliqués and very lightly on the edges.

Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

Paris Grey Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan

Holiday vignette.

Holiday vignette.

Boxwood

Boxwood

Dried hydrangea

Dried hydrangea

*******************************

A HOLIDAY TABLESCAPE

We had some friends over for supper on the weekend.  Here are some images of my simple holiday tablescape.

Holiday tablescape

Holiday tablescape

Napkin rings engraved with "Friends and Family" and fresh rosemary tucked inside.

Napkin rings engraved with "Friends and Family" and fresh rosemary tucked inside.

CHRISTMAS 2014 (Part 1)

Hello friends,

As I write this, the snow is gently falling.........

It's time to start decorating for the holidays........It's not too early is it?

We need to add some holiday cheer, especially when November can be so dreary.

Here are a few vignettes I snapped around my home.

Pine cone bouquet

Pine cone bouquet

I made this pince cone bouquet by simply hot gluing painted pine cones to sticks.  For the sticks, I used an old bamboo mat which I took apart, together with some twigs cut from my spent perennials, but you can use whatever you have on hand. Vary the heights for a nicer effect.

Snow elf

Snow elf

Snow elf

Snow elf

I purchased this snow elf many, many years ago.  Something about it appealed to me.  Must be because I have 3 boys.  I don't add much red to my holiday decor as my living room is decorated with lots of blues and greys.  Instead adding white and sliver adds to the holiday theme, with touches of greenery.

Boxwood

Boxwood

Boxwood

Boxwood

I love adding simple boxwood wreaths over my mirrors.  Their simplicity carries them through the whole winter season.

Pine cones

Pine cones

Simple pine cones and greenery get scattered here and there.

Pine cones

Pine cones

Pine cones

Pine cones

Little Christmas trees

Little Christmas trees

Little Christmas trees are really trending this year and I just love them here displayed on my coffee table of our family room.

Norfolk pine

Norfolk pine

I purchased this Norfolk Pine last November.  Yes, they can be kept as houseplants long after the holiday season.  You just have to water it once a week and fertilize it with a general all-purpose fertilizer about every 4-5 weeks.  The most important thing in keeping it healthy is to mist it with water at least once a week.

Norfolk pine.

Norfolk pine.

It's actually grown about 8 inches from last November.

If you see some browning on the tips, you can simply just snip them off.

Norfolk pine

Norfolk pine

I will be adding some twinkly Christmas lights to it.  If you do add lights, make sure they are LED so they don't give off any heat.

Wreaths

Wreaths

Small wreath

Small wreath

I snipped a faux garland and made little round wreaths and staggered them in varying heights.

Lemon plants

Lemon plants

These are potted lemon plants which I grew from lemon seeds.  I am hoping they will flower.  If it works, I will do a tutorial on growing them from seeds.  Fingers crossed!

I'm still adding and tweaking and will share more, maybe a night version.

Have a good day.

Mary

Sharing with:

Redoux InteriorsSavvy Southern Style ; Tatertots and JelloThe Big Reveal ; From My Front Porch To Yours ; Finding Silver Pennies ; Craftberry Bush ; French Country Cottage ; Minette's Maze ; Redhead Can Decorate ; Dwellings-The Heart of Your Home; By Stephanie Lynn ; Elizabeth Joan Designs ; Coastal Charm ; City Hill Farmhouse ; Mod Vintage Life ; Pneumatic Addict ; City Farmhouse ; My Uncommon Slice of Suburbia  ; Anderson & Grant ; Knick of Time ; Redoux Interiors ; Liz Marie; DIY Vintage Chic ; Creative Country Mom ; DIY Showoff ; Green Willow Pond

A PRETTY DETAILED DRESSER

Ever fall in love with a piece of furniture the minute you set your eyes on it? This was the case with this antique oak dresser.  The original details on the mirror were so pretty!

A Pretty Detailed Dresser (Old White Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan) 

A Pretty Detailed Dresser (Old White Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan) 

I wanted to leave some of the wood so I sanded the top smoothly, but not so much that I would lose the patina on the wood.  Sometimes if you sand too deep, your wood will look very white.  You can see below on the bottom left that there is some dark black spots. By leaving some of the dark patches, you will get more of an aged look.

Minwax Special Walnut stain.

Minwax Special Walnut stain.

I used Minwax Special Walnut for the stain and applied three coats of Country Chic topcoat.

I finished the bottom of the dresser with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan in Old White.  I sealed it with clear soft wax and also some dark soft wax was added, focusing mostly on the details on the mirror and edges.

Pretty detailing on mirror.

Pretty detailing on mirror.

A Pretty Detailed Dresser (Old White Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan) 

A Pretty Detailed Dresser (Old White Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan) 

This is how it looked before the transformation.

"Before"

"Before"

This dresser is for sale for local purchase only.  Please email me if interested.  Details here.

Cette commode est disponible pour vente locale seulement.  SVP, communiquer par courriel si intéresser. Détails ici.

Link parties:

Pneumatic Addict ; Green Willow Pond ; Knick of Time ; Anderson & Grant ; French Country Cottage ; Love of Family & Home ; Miss Mustard Seed ; Redoux Interiors ; The Big Reveal ; Coastal Charm ; Finding Silver Pennies

"LIQUORICE" OAK DRESSER

I recently finished another black-painted piece.  I've been getting quite a lot of requests for black pieces, and yet I thought black furniture was on its way out.  Well I guess, black is still "The New Black"!   I must admit black paint always transforms furniture to such opulence and it never disappoints!

Here is my latest..........

Oak dresser finished in "Liquorice" Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in "Liquorice" Country Chic Paint.

This oak dresser was a piece brought to me from a client that had purchased my two black end tables.  (See below).   You can read all about the transformation how I added legs to the end tables here in my post Adding Legs to End Tables.  

She also will be adding a cream-colored large Armoire to this bedroom so I think these 3 black-painted pieces will look great and help anchor the bedroom.

I finished the dresser with my go-to black paint - "Liquorice" by Country Chic Paint.  I distressed only on the perimeters and the edge moulding.  I then sealed the dresser with Minwax Furniture Paste Wax.  Since oak is a rough wood,  you will not get as much of a sheen as some of the other smoother woods.   In this case, since it was painted black, it is an advantage as finger prints show up quite a bit on black painted pieces.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

Oak dresser finished in Liquorice by Country Chic Paint.

I remembered to take a "Before" picture only after I started working on it.  The piece had previously been stripped so the paint adhered very well and therefore did not require any sanding.

As you can see, I had to paint this dresser in my entrance as my garage is presently bursting at the seams with furniture.  I recently acquired a beautiful  four-poster bedroom set dating from the late 40's.  Can't wait to start painting it,  but I have to finish some commission pieces first.   I am also hoping to find some time to add some winter ambience in my home with some evergreens, pine cones and wreaths and hopefully snap a few pictures.

There are just not enough hours in a day............

"Before"

"Before"

*********************************

A few weeks ago, I showed you a "Fall Inspired Sideboard" which I had posted about but only got the chance to show you a few pieces separately.  My client was nice enough to send me some pictures taken from her home.   You can now see it all put together.  She has a beautiful charming home and I think her set looks great in the room.

IMG_0037.JPG

PLAIN KITCHEN CUPBOARDS TO SHAKER STYLE

Well this post has been long overdue!  My first post ever was a recap of my Budget Kitchen Makeover and I had promised to do an in-depth tutorial on how we (well "we" is actually my husband!) transformed our kitchen cupboards. That was 1-1/2 years ago.  I know, I know - bad blogger! The biggest change was transforming our plain melamine rust coloured cupboards to shaker-style cupboards.  I've put off writing this post because I was not sure how to recreate and explain it when it is not work-in-progress, but since I have received a few emails inquiring about a tutorial, I thought I would attempt to explain it. 

It is a long post, and a little technical.  Hope it makes sense to you.

So this was how the kitchen looked after the reno was done (this was about 4-1/2 years ago).  You can read how we did it here on a $4,000.00 budget, but this post is focusing only on the transformation of the kitchen cupboards.

We had our house built 18 years ago and below were the cupboards that came with the house.  Plain old builder's melamine cupboards.  They were looking outdated and frankly that rust colour was just too loud for me.  I longed for white shaker-style cupboards!  Since the cupboards were still in good shape, we decided to re-style them.

Kitchen_before_147.jpg

........and here are some close-ups of some of the transformed exterior doors.

Exterior doors.

Kitchen_130425_4832.jpg

........and here is a close-up of one of the interior doors.

We started by removing all the doors from the cupboards and the fronts of the drawers.  I chose to leave the drawers as is and just painted them.  We did not remove the cupboards from the wall so it made living with this reno a lot easier.

We gave all the doors and fronts a really good sanding.

Then we measured two inches around each door.  This is where you are going to cut through your doors.  Even though the doors were different sizes, I still cut 2 inches everywhere.  So what you are left with is basically a frame with a hole in the middle.  The "X" below gets removed and will be replaced by 1/4" mdf.

Kitchen_130425_4832.jpg

OK, so this is where it gets too technical for me and so I've asked my hubby to step in and explain this to you all in detail.

"To start the square hole, I first drilled 4 holes through the doors with a drill, then used a jigsaw to cut the whole square out.

Your hole will be a little rough, so you can use a pad sander or file to smooth it out a bit. The corners are especially important and a chisel can help square it up.

Once the hole is made, a rabid joint must be made in the back of the door so that the recessed mdf board can fit flush.  I used a router with a 1/2 inch bit and a center pilot guide. As you go around you will notice that the corners of the new recessed area are rounded rather than square.  It is easier to round off the corners on the new board than to try to square-off the cut.

It will be easier to round-off corners than to try and square them.

It will be easier to round-off corners than to try and square them.

When you cut the board you can leave a tiny gap so as to allow expansion, just to be safe, although the board will be glued with carpenter's glue and will probably become whole with the door.

Once the board is ready, a generous amount of glue is applied and a weight is put on the back to assure both pieces of wood are in full contact during the drying period.  Once dried, scrape off the excess glue from the front.

You can now add the small decorative moulding around the front.  This moulding will help to hide the chipping that may have occurred when cutting the hole with the jigsaw.

You can glue it and nail it in place with a pin nailer.  Do not attempt to nail this with a hammer and nails, as these will be too big and will wreck the delicate moulding.

Now that's one heck of a bed-time story, guaranteed to put you to sleep ;-)"

Thanks Mike!

When all the doors were done, we sent them out to a refinisher and had them spray-lacquered a "Pure White" color.  This cost only $800.00.  Now because we did not remove and send out the whole cupboards, but merely the doors, there were some sides of the cabinets that needed painting.  For these, we purchased some "Pure White" paint (I believe I used Behr paint and primer) and just rolled on the paint. (See black squiggly lines below).  You could barely tell the lacquered doors to the rolled-on doors.  Sending out only doors will save time and money.

To break-up all of the white cupboards, we decided to add glass to some of the cupboard doors, so for these we did not add the mdf board but had glass installed.  I sent out these doors to a glass and window store. 

The original mint green contrast moulding that was originally installed on the top and bottom of the cupboards also got removed and I left it as is.  I think just this makes a big difference in updating kitchen cupboards.

So that's about it.

Sharing with:

Redhead Can Decorate ; DIY Showoff ; Nifty Thrifty Things ; Finding Silver Pennies ; Dwellings-The Heart of Your Home ; By Stephanie Lynn ; Elizabeth Joan Designs; The Dedicated House ; Home Stories A to Z ; Mod Vintage Life ; My Uncommon Slice of Suburbia ; Coastal Charm ; Elizabeth & Co.; Kammy's Korner ; Savvy Southern Style ; Green Willow Pond ; My Repurposed Life ; From My Front Porch to Yours ; Anderson & Grant ; Craftberry Bush ; French Country Cottage ; Liz Marie ;