PARIS GREY ANTIQUE SIDEBOARD

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This is one of those pieces that really had me torn as to whether I should paint it or leave it as is.  Well, as you can see I took the plunge and painted it.  I loved it in wood but in today's home decor it just does not seem to fit in many homes and since I did purchase it to re-sell it, to leave it as is does not have any resale value.  But having said that, after I painted it, I loved it so much that I am debating whether I should keep it.  It is now sitting in my living room and with my recent purchase of a new sofa, it blends very well with my other greys and blues.  (I will eventually show a picture of my whole living room when it is more complete.  I still need to sew some new pillows and accent the walls).  The only problem is that it is much too high in proportion with my other furniture and I would have to cut off a few inches on the bottom legs.

I painted this sideboard with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  I painted the first coat with "Paris Grey".  On the second coat, I added a little bit of "Graphite" to my "Paris Grey" to give it a bit of layering.

I sealed the entire piece (inside and out with Hemp Oil) and then I went back and applied one coat of clear wax for extra durability and more sheen.  (Note:  You can apply wax after using Hemp Oil; but NEVER wax and then oil!)

Painted with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  "Paris Grey" for the first coat and then a little bit of "Graphite" added to the "Paris Grey" for the second coat to achieve a layering effect.

Painted with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  "Paris Grey" for the first coat and then a little bit of "Graphite" added to the "Paris Grey" for the second coat to achieve a layering effect.

Painted with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  "Paris Grey" for the first coat and then a little bit of "Graphite" added to the "Paris Grey" for the second coat to achieve a layering effect.

Painted with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  "Paris Grey" for the first coat and then a little bit of "Graphite" added to the "Paris Grey" for the second coat to achieve a layering effect.

I also painted the interior of the drawers and the cabinets with Chalk Paint®.  I used "Louis Blue" and added a bit of "Old White" for a lighter shade.

I love how Paris Grey and Louis Blue go together.

I love how Paris Grey and Louis Blue go together.

Slight layering with "Paris Grey" only on the first coat and "Paris Grey with a bit of "Graphite" added to the second coat.

Slight layering with "Paris Grey" only on the first coat and "Paris Grey with a bit of "Graphite" added to the second coat.

I did not go crazy with the distressing, just enough to bring out some of the pretty features.

Distressed to bring out pretty details.

Distressed to bring out pretty details.

I replaced all the hardware with brushed nickel hardware which I purchased at Réno-Dépot Hardware.  I always love the look of grey and silver metal together.  I had to make new holes for the hardware as the original hardware had only one and these required 2 holes.  I will eventually do a post on how I do this.

The blanket you see at the right in the picture above was hand-crocheted by my mom.   It is truly a work of art.  It is a whole bunch of crocheted small squares and then joined together to form the blanket and a fringe with pom poms at the edge. It is definitely something I would love to learn to do.  She made this blanket so many years ago and if she can remember how to do this, I will do a tutorial.

So here is the "Before" picture.  It actually is a really good "Before" picture.  It really did not look as nice in person.

GOLD-LEAFING 101

Gold-leafed wooden salad bowls

Gold-leafed wooden salad bowls

Gold metal has been making such a comeback these days and so I thought it would be appropriate to do a tutorial post about "gold-leafing".  It is actually very easy.  The other day I showed you these salad bowls I recycled.  I started by painting the exterior with General Finishes paint in "Corinth Blue" (see original post here).

And now for gold-leafing…….

Materials needed for gold-leafing.  Silver-leafing sheets are also available, along with other metals.

Materials needed for gold-leafing.  Silver-leafing sheets are also available, along with other metals.

Materials needed:

1 pack gold-leaf sheets

1 gold-leaf medium

1 soft brush (for picking up gold-leaf sheets)

1 brush (for brushing on medium (glue)

item to be gold-leafed

I'm using old salad wooden bowls

This is what my bowls looked like after painting the blue.

This is what my bowls looked like after painting the blue.

Next step is to apply the gold-leafing medium to the inside of the bowls (where you want your gold to be).  Try to be as precise as possible with your brushing.  Wherever you add the medium, the gold sheets will stick.  Let stand 5 to 10 minutes (or until it becomes tacky).

Applying gold-leaf medium

Applying gold-leaf medium

Now it's time to apply the gold-leaf sheets.  The simplest way I find to do this step is to pick up the sheets with a soft brush instead of your hands.  You can use the whole sheet or tear it in smaller pieces (depending on the look you want).  These gold-leaf sheets are also available in larger format for larger projects.

Best to work in a draft-free room!

After you've picked up your gold sheet, press it down to where you've applied your glue (medium) and smooth it over with your soft brush.

Keep layering and smoothing until all surface is covered.  

You can choose to have some of the wood to peek through, depending on the look you want.

As you can see from the left bowl above, there is some gold-leafing on the rim of the bowl that should not be there.  To give it a cleaner edge, I went over the rim with some sanding paper very lightly and cleaned up the edges.

At this point, it might be a little sticky.  Let it dry out completely, then go over with your soft brush and brush out all of the loose gold-leaf pieces and give it a last smooth over.

Gold-leafed bowls

Gold-leafed bowls


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I had also done some bowls in black a little while back using silver and gold leafing.

So that's all there is to gold-leafing.  Imagine all the possibilities????????

- Mary -

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ACCENT TABLE & PAINTED BOWLS

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HELLO, it's been a while since I posted.  Sometimes when you accept to do custom jobs they, unfortunately, are not always "bloggable-worthy" and am often on tight deadlines with no time to photograph them properly, but am not complaining as it does bring in steady work.

Well, I was recently contacted by General Finishes Corporation to see if I would be interested in testing their products.  I had been hearing and wanting to try out this new paint and was happy to do so.

They sent me 2 paint colours (Dark Chocolate and Corinth Blue)  and a satin top coat.  These are all water-based products.  The paints are pre-mixed acrylic paints and come in 28 mixable colours.  They actually have "LAMP BLACK" (a true black) in their line which I am very excited about.  I chose to try them out on 2 small projects:

ACCENT TABLE

I had this accent table which was presently a light green colour and had been wanting to repaint it.

"BEFORE"

"BEFORE"

I chose to paint this one in the "Dark Chocolate" colour and I sealed it with the High Performance Waterbased Top Coat (Satin).  The paint covered really well and barely left any brush marks.  I also distressed the edges with a sanding block and it distressed very easily.  The drying time is maybe a little longer than some of the other decorative paints but I was surprised that it needed only 1 coat.  Here are some "AFTER" pictures.

Accent Table - Painted with General Finishes "Dark Chocolate"

Accent Table - Painted with General Finishes "Dark Chocolate"

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I can see great use for this colour, especially with mid-century modern pieces.  Also is great when you want to distress  a piece of furniture with wood showing through and that is not in its original wood state, as in this case, and you want to add a colour and distress it.  You can easily "fake" the wood underneath with this colour.  Make sure to top coat in between to create a barrier.

PAINTED BOWLS

"BEFORE"

"BEFORE"

I decided to use the "Corinth Blue" paint colour on these old salad bowls.   As soon as I saw this colour, I just imagined how beautifully it would compliment with gold metal and so I painted the exterior of these bowls with the "Corinth Blue" and then decided to gold-leaf the inside.  For those of you who have never tried gold-leafing, it is very easy.  I will do a short post on this next.

Upcycled salad bowls painted with General Finishes "Corinth Blue" milk paint and gold-leafed.

Upcycled salad bowls painted with General Finishes "Corinth Blue" milk paint and gold-leafed.

For this project I distressed the bowls by hand rubbing them with a wet rag and it distressed very nicely.  I then top coated the exterior with the High Performace Waterbased Top Coat. 

General Finishes "Corinth Blue" milk paint

General Finishes "Corinth Blue" milk paint

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Overall, I really loved the way these products performed and will use these on future projects, especially when I want a "true black".   Hope you found this post informative.

You can find a retailer of General Finishes products here.

Have a great day!

- Mary -

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UPDATED DINING ROOM SET

Updated dining room set with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan in "Old White".

Updated dining room set with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan in "Old White".

Here is a dining room set I just finished painting for a client.  It was originally Forest Green, so typical of furniture from the 90's decade.  She requested that just the Forest Green be repainted in Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan in "Old White".

Here is a "Before" picture she gave me taken in her home.

"Before" in typical "Forest Green" from the 90's decade.

"Before" in typical "Forest Green" from the 90's decade.

 I had a few days before she picked it up so I took the liberty of photographing the finished dining room set in my kitchen.  Even though many of the pieces I paint are custom pieces, I still make an effort to photograph them in a room setting.

When I first saw this dining room set, I knew that all those little posts would make this a very tedious job, but I have to say that I underestimated the number of hours it took to hand paint, sand and wax.  Since it was difficult to paint  long smooth brush strokes, I had to spend a very, very long time sanding everything down, especially all those posts, to smooth down the brush strokes.  In the end, it did turn out very nice.  

I did contemplate spray painting initially and I would love to hear from anyone who has used a spray gun with Chalk Paint®.  What model/brand spray gun are you using?  What results have you gotten?  It is something that I would like to invest in, especially for pieces like these.

9 little tiny posts x 6 chairs = many, many hours.

9 little tiny posts x 6 chairs = many, many hours.


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Well I am definitely glad to see this project finished.

Have a great weekend.

- Mary -

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* Finding Silver Pennies *  The Interior Frugalista *  By Stephanie Lynn *  Mod Vintage Life *  Coastal Charm * Knick of Time *  Stone Gable *  A Stroll Thru Life *  Elizabeth & Co. *  Savvy Southern Style *  Embracing Change *  Chic By Tab

 

HANGING SCROLLWORK (UPCYCLED DOOR MAT)

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Well here is a little craft project I did the other day which you may have got a glimpse of in my last blog post about my china cabinet.  It's so simple and easy and takes about 1-1/2 hours.  It is a project I found on Pinterest a little while back and have been wanting to replicate it for the longest time.  Don't you just love Pinterest?  I am so inspired by all the creative projects out there.  You can follow along with me on Pinterest to see where I get some of my inspiration.  The Pinterest button is at the bottom of my page.

Well this beautiful scrollwork is NOT metal, it is actually a rubber door mat which I purchased at Target Canada for $24.99 (for my U.S. readers, I am sure it will be priced much lower!).

So you can find them in different sizes. 

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I painted mine with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  I used two colours Old White and Pure White.  I started painting the base with the Old White first since it gives better coverage compared to the Pure White which tends to be a little more translucent.  After the Old White Chalk Paint® dried, I went over with Pure White Chalk Paint® here and there to create a little bit of layering.

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After it dried, I went over with a wet rag and rubbed off some of the paint here and there and this is the result.

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