WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

Furniture Makeover
WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

Hello friends – Just before the holidays I posted about my dilemma on how to finish this gorgeous antique oak Renaissance-style buffet.  My intention was to purchase a marble top and I was pondering about possibly applying a lime wax or whitewash to the body.  If you remember, with all of its beauty, it was missing the top and there was a big drip mark on the side.  Here are some pictures to remind you of what I started with.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

Well, I simplified the makeover and instead of a marble top, I had my husband build me a wood top (the one in the above picture was just a temporary one).  Since this buffet is made of oak, I purchased three oak planks from Home Depot and glued them together.  After gluing them side-by-side and cutting them to size, the three planks were not aligning 100% so I had to sand the top of the three glued planks until I achieved a flat, smooth top.  Then to create a bit of a profile on the side edges, three of the edges were routered.  The routering gives it a more finished look rather than just leaving square edges.

As I mentioned, I did initially want a marble top and spent lots of time shopping for one, but honestly, it was just too expensive and since I will be selling this piece (although I have been enjoying it in my dining room), I did not feel that I could recoup the cost.  The quotes for just a piece of granite, not even marble, that somewhat resembled Carrara marble was in the range of $400-450.  I did find a few odd end pieces but the color was not right.  They had brown in the veining and I was really looking for all white with light grey veining.

As for the finish, because it had that nasty drip on the side and also because I really did not want to cover up the wood, I chose to WHITEWASH the piece.

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

Did you notice my new window cornices in the picture below?  I’ll talk about what I used to repurpose these a little later in the post.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

By applying a wash, the drip mark  that was on the left side more or less fades into the paint and grain of the wood.  For the wash I diluted about 3 parts water to one part paint.  I used Fusion Mineral Paint in the color Casement.

 

Here is a close-up of the beautiful carvings which are now beautifully emphasized with the whitewash.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

(This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links, I make a small commission for purchases made through that link.  Read full disclosure here)

There is one thing I want to emphasize when applying a whitewash.  To make it look authentic, it’s important to paint in long, straight strokes, in the direction of the wood grain and even out any blotchy areas (and you WILL most likely have uneven patches).  What I did after I applied the wash was sanded down and really applied hard pressure with #0000 steel wool on the areas that were too dark with paint.  Then also an overall fine-sanding with the steel wool.  I did spend quite a bit of time fine-sanding, to the point that the steel wool created  a shiny wax finish on its own.  (I think a reader once told me this was called a French Polish).  Anyone familiar with this?

 

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

Since the top was created with raw wood planks, I tested a few combination of stains to come as close as possible to recreate the original stain as on the body of the buffet.  What worked best was a mix of 2 Minwax stains, “Dark Walnut” and “Provincial”.  After applying the stain to the top and drying overnight, I then applied the same whitewash finish.  I let the wash dry overnight and sealed the top with wax.  I did not wax the body since as I mentioned, the really fine-sanding with the #0000 steel wool left a beautiful sheen.

 

I explained in detail how I went about applying a wash on a previous post I did a little while back.  You can read all the details on this dresser post below.  Click here.

 

 

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

(Whitewash Dresser)

 

 

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

 

I also made the two moss heart wreaths and I am working on the tutorial and will be posting about it in the next few days.

Here are some quick I-phone pictures I took during the process of the buffet makeover.  Below you see how the wash looked right after painting.  I felt the white paint was still too strong and I wanted it to be more translucent.  More of the wood showing.

 

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

(Work-in-progress)

 

Always paint your strokes in the direction of the wood grain and even out the patches.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

(Work-in-progress)

 

I also painted these book bundles in “Little Piggy” also by Fusion Mineral Paint.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

(painted book bundles)

 

You may want to read a similar post from last year on how to make Valentine Book Bundles.

VALENTINE BOOK BUNDLES

 

PIN IT!

 

Oh, before I forget, about the window cover mouldings, I was shopping at HomeSense right after the New Year and I found two decorative shelves in the liquidation rack.  My house is a new build and as with all new builds, there is always a lack of architectural details and with time I am always seeking ways to inject that into my home.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

I painted and distressed these with the same color paint as my walls (Behr – Pillar White) and repurposed them as window cornices.

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

WHITEWASH, LIME WAX, PAINT? (Pt 2)

 

Wishing you a great afternoon.

-Mary-



Sharing here:

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61 Comments

  • Reply
    Kelly
    January 13, 2017 at 1:39 pm

    That turned out absolutely gorgeous! I’d buy a bigger house to make room for it, rather than selling it!

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 13, 2017 at 1:55 pm

      Oh Kelly, I am so tempted to keep it.

  • Reply
    Lisa Elkins
    January 13, 2017 at 1:50 pm

    And I Love your light fixture also!

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 13, 2017 at 1:56 pm

      Thanks Lisa. The light fixture is from Parrot Uncle.

  • Reply
    Annie (Canada)
    January 13, 2017 at 2:06 pm

    Beautiful!! I love this technique <3 Regarding the 'French Polish, what it really is is a very labour intensive finish done by applying many thin coats of shellac dissolved in alcohol and polishing it into the wood using a pad lubricated with oil. People don't generally do this sort of finish any more because it takes a lot of time and elbow grease 🙂 Now a days some people will call any very glossy finishes as a French Polish.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:25 am

      Thanks for enlightening us, Annie.

      • Reply
        Robyn
        March 21, 2017 at 6:45 am

        We have a few pieces of furniture my husband made & French Polished using Shelac, now that I’ve discovered whitewashing he is actually going to let me ‘renovate’ them ! I thought he’d object, but he’s seen what I’ve been doing with pieces I’ve picked up 2nd hand & is keen for me to re-decorate ! Yay!

        • Reply
          Mary
          March 21, 2017 at 7:11 am

          Yay! That’s great. I would suggest practising your brush strokes on a scrap piece of plywood before.

          • Robyn
            March 21, 2017 at 6:35 pm

            Thanks Mary, I have done a few pieces already & we have some home renovating to do before I can attack the French polished pieces. I love what you have done with the ornate shelving, how creative 🙂

  • Reply
    Charlotte
    January 13, 2017 at 2:28 pm

    I love the buffet and I wouldn’t be able to part with it. Also, the window toppers are wonderful.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:27 am

      Thank you so much Charlotte and have a great day.

  • Reply
    Denise
    January 13, 2017 at 2:28 pm

    Hi Mary! The buffet turned out amazing! I also love the repurposed shelves as window cover mouldings. Brilliant! x

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:30 am

      Thanks Denise and have a great day.

  • Reply
    Linda
    January 13, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    You’ve just gotta keep this piece. It is truly one of a kind. Make a trade with yourself, if necessary. Get rid of something else! Love this.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:32 am

      It is a great piece and trying to see how I can reconfigure some of my furniture to make it work. Stay tuned!

  • Reply
    Susie
    January 13, 2017 at 8:01 pm

    Hi Mary! That beautiful piece is just perfect with a whitewash finish. All of your sanding truly paid off. I’d love that piece to come live in my house. Love the window treatment, too ! Susie from The Chelsea Project

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:38 am

      Ha Ha! It really is an amazing piece of furniture. I really got lucky in finding this piece.

  • Reply
    kathy Nielsen
    January 13, 2017 at 10:15 pm

    Beautiful job. Just love it. And……your shelves are awesome. Question. When white washing a piece of furniture it looks as if the piece has never had any stain or paint applied to it. Is this true?

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:41 am

      This piece definitely had a stain and probably at some point it must have had some seal, probably wax, but it is so old that whatever it was sealed with is gone. This technique obviously works best with rougher woods like oak or old pine, or something with lots of carvings so that the white paint has somewhere to settle.

  • Reply
    Cynthia Chilson Finger
    January 14, 2017 at 6:37 am

    Mary, I just want to say how much I enjoy your blog. Your photography and staging are as beautiful as your furniture painting. Thank you for sharing your many talents! Happy New Year, Cynthia

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:42 am

      Thank you so much, Cynthia. You say the sweetest things!

  • Reply
    Janie Hayes
    January 14, 2017 at 8:28 am

    Love it!

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 14, 2017 at 8:52 am

      Thank you Janie.

  • Reply
    Marie from The Interior Frugalista
    January 15, 2017 at 11:38 am

    I really love the patina the whitewash technique gave this piece. Noted the steel wool tip. You’d never know a new top was added. Beautiful makeover, Mary! Love how you cleverly repurposed the wood shelves into window toppers – such statement pieces.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 17, 2017 at 11:34 am

      I’m glad you don’t notice the difference between with the new top. It’s what I was hoping for. Have a great day, Marie.

  • Reply
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  • Reply
    Claire Pillarboxblue
    January 19, 2017 at 11:28 am

    I have a dark mango wood dining table that I am dying to white wash to lighten it up a bit. My husband is not so keen but hopefully if I show him your beautiful post he might change is mind. In fact I might just go ahead and do it anyway now that I have your tutorial. Lovely photos by the way too.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 19, 2017 at 5:08 pm

      Crossing my fingers that your husband will be inspired. Good luck if you go ahead with the project, Claire.

  • Reply
    Sandra Garth
    January 19, 2017 at 7:00 pm

    Congrats on this beautiful transformation and thank you for sharing with us this week at Celebrate Your Story, have a great weekend.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 21, 2017 at 9:06 am

      Thank you Sandra, it was my pleasure.

  • Reply
    Mary-The Boondocks Blog
    January 19, 2017 at 9:08 pm

    Mary you saved that piece and stayed true to its character. I have an MCM piece that I am thinking of whitewashing. Is it possible to do it with milk paint?

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 21, 2017 at 9:08 am

      Yes, definitely. Just use less water than my ratio as milk paint is already a bit more translucent.

  • Reply
    Carol@blueskykitchen
    January 20, 2017 at 8:43 am

    The whitewash treatment of the buffet is perfect. I love how the embellishments poped out when you applied the whitewash. I also like the wood top ~ I think it’s more authentic than if you had added marble. Thank you for sharing at Your Inspired Design.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 21, 2017 at 9:12 am

      Thanks Carol, always enjoy your link party.

  • Reply
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  • Reply
    Ginny Regopoulos
    January 24, 2017 at 8:34 am

    Love your piece ! Just wondering if this technique could go over a dark grey painted dresser or is this primarily for wood?

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 24, 2017 at 8:55 am

      Yes you can. It would give more of a “coastal look”.

  • Reply
    Cristina~Finding Grace
    January 24, 2017 at 7:23 pm

    Mary, you did an amazing job with this buffet. It is absolutely gorgeous!! I really think you should keep it. It looks stunning in your home! Also love the window cornices. Very clever idea!!

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 24, 2017 at 8:28 pm

      Thank you so much, Cristina. I’m still holding on to it for now!

  • Reply
    Diana
    January 25, 2017 at 2:30 pm

    Loved learning about the white wash process (your piece is stunning!)–pinned and facebooked–

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 25, 2017 at 8:27 pm

      Thanks Diana, much appreciated.

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  • Reply
    Holly {McCall Manor}
    January 25, 2017 at 8:25 pm

    This is gorgeous! Featuring it at Your Inspired Design this week!

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 25, 2017 at 8:28 pm

      Thank you so much, Holly. I’m thrilled!

  • Reply
    loveyoumoredesigns
    January 25, 2017 at 11:30 pm

    This piece is now absolutely gorgeous and your tutorial is fabulous:) Thank you for sharing it with us over at Vintage Charm Party #66. xo Kathleen Charm Bracelet Diva {At Home}

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 26, 2017 at 6:56 am

      Thanks, it was my pleasure.

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  • Reply
    Tanya Derrey-Bingham
    January 26, 2017 at 3:26 pm

    Just began following you Mary, this is gorgeous!!

    xo, Tanya
    http://www.twelveoeightblog.com/

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 27, 2017 at 8:08 am

      Thank you,Tanya and welcome!

  • Reply
    Lin
    January 26, 2017 at 6:57 pm

    Your piece turned out beautiful! Thank you so very much for adding the info about the wood over the windows. That is the main reason I came over to ask you about them. The are fantastic!! I am not familiar with that store. We have Home Goods but not Home Sense. I am hoping I will be able to find them somewhere.

    • Reply
      Mary
      January 27, 2017 at 8:10 am

      Thanks for chiming in about the window cornices. Actually HomeSense is Canada’s version of Marshall’s/TJ Maxx. I’m sure HomeGoods also carries some. Have a great day, Lin.

  • Reply
    Kit Lang Art
    February 15, 2017 at 2:38 pm

    Here from Ms. Mustard Seed.

    Love the job you did on that beautiful dresser; but your cornice treatment is sheer genius! (See what I did there? lol)

    Our house is an oldie and has great baroque fireplaces and wonderful wood trim features on the main floor; but on the second and third floor, someone “updated” it and removed all of those wonderful features excepting the fireplaces. Thanks for this great trick!

    • Reply
      Mary
      February 17, 2017 at 12:30 pm

      Thanks for visiting. It really is an inexpensive way to create architectural interest.

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  • Reply
    Lynne
    July 8, 2017 at 3:05 pm

    Mary, I happened on your blog, and “LOVE” it. That whitewashed piece is genius and gorgeous. Did you use a chalk paint, or just a flat latex I’m wondering?

    Thanxx!
    Lynne

    • Reply
      Mary
      July 10, 2017 at 9:51 am

      I used Fusion Mineral Paint, watered down. Details are on the blog post.

  • Reply
    Jauquetta
    July 19, 2018 at 3:08 am

    Love this white washed piece! I buy pieces that have tops that are shot! Then i faux marble them. My chest of drawers was so convincing that the moving company told me they had to charge extra to get it down my stairs! I laughed, reached over w one hand and lifted the piece. Even once they realized it, they still had to touch and pick it up!

    • Reply
      Mary
      July 22, 2018 at 3:50 pm

      That’s too funny.

    I always love to hear your comments.

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